Category: Language Lessons

Ways to say “Yes” in Chamorro

When it comes to speaking Chamorro, most language resources will only include how one should say something. And so this is true for the Chamorro word for “yes”. Most books or even online resources will offer only the formal way to say “yes”, which is hunggan.

While there’s nothing wrong with saying hunggan all the time, a lot of Chamorro speakers tend to use the casual forms of yes in everyday conversation.

The most common response you’ll hear in a conversation will be hå’å, or its variants å’å, ha’a, or a’a. It would be like say yeah or yup.

Another way to say yes would be to say hu’u or u’u, but this response is usually used when someone is annoyed: Yes! (I heard you.) Yes! (I get it, no need to repeat yourself.)

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What does “dalai” mean?

The Chamorro word dalai has no equivalent in the English language. It is an expression used to convey disbelief that something is true due to some existing knowledge about the subject. It is often used in statements where one expects that anyone with some common sense would’ve done the right thing.

Dalai ya ti siña un hatsa i lamasa.
 
I can’t believe you can’t lift the table. (You have muscles and look strong! / The table is so small/light/etc.)

Dalai ya ti ha tungo’ manu na gaige Safeway.
It’s unbelievable he doesn’t know where Safeway is. (He’s lived here for how long? / Safeway is so close to his house! /

Dalai na dinidide’. 
I can’t believe how little. (Who would be so stingy? / But he has lots!)

Denise said she can’t come to the party? Dalai! She’s not working tomorrow.
(It is unbelievable because maybe Denise only refuses to go out when she has work the next day.)

 

Have a question? Email webmagas@chamoru.info.

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